Skip to main content
Oxford,
19
September
2018
|
14:36
Europe/London

Be a winner by becoming a quitter: Visit our new Smokefreelife Oxfordshire service

A new stop smoking service funded by Oxfordshire County Council’s Public Health team launches in Abingdon next week – just in time for Stoptober, the annual awareness campaign that sees thousands of people quit each year.

Through our new county-wide Smokefreelife Oxfordshire service – which is also being showcased at Cowley and Banbury - we are encouraging people to embrace the many immediate and long-term health benefits of quitting cigarettes. And we’re giving out free therapies to help you on the road to a smoke free future.

By stopping smoking you’ll reduce your risk of heart and lung disease and you’ll be financially better off. A 20-a-day smoker spends more than £4,000 a year feeding their habit.

Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death in the UK and contributes to around 100,000 deaths each year.

While smoking rates have fallen steadily in Oxfordshire and are below the national average, one in eight people are still lighting up in the county.

Stop smoking advisors in Solutions 4 Health’s ‘wellness-on-wheels’ vans will be giving out free nictotine replacement therapy - patches, mouth spray, nasal spray, lozenges and micro tabs - at the launch event in Market Place, Abingdon, on Friday, September 28.

From 10am to 4pm our experts will be giving guidance on quitting aids and making referrals for you for ongoing support. They also be explaining some of the latest help on offer including face-to-face, telephone and text support, to video chats and a new digital app Bella.

There’ll also be activities for children, like football skills sessions and colouring tables, so you can stay focussed on your new health regime while youngsters play. No appointments are necessary.

Further events will take place at Templars Square Shopping Centre, Cowley, Oxford, on October 4 and at Castle Quay Shopping Centre, Banbury, on October 11. Both run between 10am and 3pm.

Dr Eunan O’Neill, Consultant in Public Health at Oxfordshire County Council, said: “Giving up smoking is probably the single most important health decision you can make for you and your family. Research shows when smokers give up for 28 days they are up to five times more likely to stay smoke-free for good. Make a positive decision to stop this October and let our experts support you. You won’t regret it.”

Elizabeth West, Health Improvement Manager at Smokefreelife Oxfordshire, said: “There are so many benefits to giving up smoking and Smokefreelife Oxfordshire will be able to help with advice and support from fully qualified advisors.Join us for a fun day of activities and to gather more information of what services we can offer you from advice to training. I look forward to seeing you all there”.

Get involved

Anyone thinking about taking the Stoptober challenge should drop by for a chat with one of the friendly and supportive advisors, they will give guidance on quitting aids and make referrals for ongoing support.

Be a quitter

Sign up to Stoptober, the UK’s biggest Stop Smoking challenge. By joining in, you will have access to a range of free support via email, an app and Facebook Messenger - all providing information, advice and daily tips to help you through the month. Support is also available from your local GP and pharmacy.

Contact the Smokefreelife Oxfordshire team directly on 01865 238 036 or email info@smokefreelifeoxfordshire.co.uk for support and the best chance of giving up for good. Alternatively, like us on Twitter or Facebook (@smokefreelifeOx) or visit the website at: www.smokefreelifeoxfordshire.co.uk

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU QUIT SMOKING

  • After 2-12 weeks: Your circulation improves.
  • After 3-9 months: Coughs, wheezing and breathing problems improve as lung function increases by up to 10%.
  • After 1 year: Risk of heart disease is about half compared with a person who is still smoking.
  • After 10 years: Risk of lung cancer falls to half that of a smoker.
  • After 15 years: Risk of heart attack falls to the same as someone who has never smoked.
Access key details Skip to main content Home News Sitemap Search Website help Complaints Terms and conditions Website feedback
Please complete a short survey about this site.